Curiosity Is Fuel

My whole life I have felt out of place. And I think part of that is because I seem to be curious about everything.

Was it because I love reading so much?

Because I moved so many times?

Because for the longest time I didn’t care about being cool?

Or maybe it was because of my LEGO collection, which is still super cool.

The truth is, there’s a lot of us trying to figure out their journey. I recently turned 25. And in my time on the Pale Blue Dot I’ve been:

Do you have a LEGO ship this cool? That also apparently stole the Eiffel Tower from Paris? This is what Super Cool looks like.

Do you have a LEGO ship this cool? That also apparently stole the Eiffel Tower from Paris? This is what Super Cool looks like.

  • an aspiring Superhero
  • a writer
  • stuck with bad science teachers
  • a Social Activist
  • an NPO Co-Founder
  • a door-to-door salesman
  • a lifeguard
  • a home builder
  • a sailor
  • a shoe salesman
  • a Freshman (read: Intro To Everything)
  • a student in China
  • an accounting major
  • a professional intern
  • a regretful accounting major
  • a graduate student
  • and now, a New Yorker.

HOLY-!

That is one of the craziest paths I could have come up with. And now, I’m spending all my time not at work to change the nature of that work. In the past year I’ve taught myself Ruby, Rails, Javascript, HTML, CSS, and am currently figuring out how this fits in with my ability to take big, macro-level ideas like,

“Can a constant exist in socioeconomic systems?”

“Can a constant exist in socioeconomic systems?”

...down to micro-level passions like,

“How do we make sure little Joan in Kenya has a school nearby?”

See, I believe curiosity is the greatest gift you could ever give yourself.

The right and the freedom to be curious, to question, to try something new, to go somewhere old, to see something differently. But if you do it without humility there’s little chance you’ll learn anything.

Imagine a guy who goes through life spouting all that he knows. He spends the majority of his time telling others how much he knows and why he knows it but never questions how he knows it. He’s Mr. Incurious. He believes he knows and that’s enough for him. He’ll never allow himself the humility to be curious.

Then there’s a girl who knows how little she knows (btw, Socrates’ definition of education). She loves to learn and, despite being a mother, loves the feeling of childlike curiosity that comes with being a beginner. Every conversation is a new lesson, every field of infinite value, every truth subject to question, and every idea inspected. Life is infinitely fascinating precisely because she does not know all the answers and there’s always more to learn.

Who would you rather follow? Who would you rather befriend?

All this to say, “I’m very happy you’re here, let’s be friends, and we’ll see how this plays out in the coming years.”

Stay curious. Stay brave.